Playing With Github and Visual Studio Code

Playing With Github and Visual Studio Code

Today I felt like taking a break from studying WordPress. I played with some code from a book I got for free on the Apple Bookstore. At this moment this code is consolidation. I will get to the challenging stuff later. I have read, from many sources, that it’s good to have examples of your work online when you learn to code.

There are two steps to take although I don’t think the order matters. The first is to create a new repisotory on There are two steps to take although I don’t think the order matters. The first is to create a new repository on WordPress. In my case it is Laughing Raclette. The name is ridiculous, but it’s available, and absurdity and humour are good. Once you have created a repository, it will provide you with help on how to connect your local directory. I connected it via Terminal in VS Code, to my online repository. The process was quick and simple.

When I work from books and courses I commit changes to git at the end of each individual lesson. If it is video based this will be at the end of the video. If I am working from a book it will be at the end of the chapter. I have the same break points as the course. We can then step through our work. We can revise a chapter that we are struggling to get to grips with.

If you writing code and you make a typo, then git and github are useful. With track changes you can compare your erroneous code with that of the instructor. Once you know what the error is you can move on with the course. In future you know to look out for that typo, or erroneous code.

The other benefit of studying code and commiting to Git and Github is that we develop the habits that will be required prThere is another benefit of studying code and committing to Git and Github. It is that we develop the required professional habits. We learn to use the active voice, and to write clear, and succinct descriptions.

It is when we study that we need to pick up good habits. It allows us to show the trial and errors, in some case, but also the rate of progress. The skills that we practice as we learn, have the time to become professional habits later on. We can also get feedback during the process.

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